Come Celebrate the U.S. Army’s Birthday with the 59 Veterans Project!

WE NEED TO SHARE THIS WITH ALL AMERICANS!

It’s our distinct pleasure and honor here at the 59 VETERANS PROJECT to wish the greatest standing army in the world a VERY HAPPY 243RD BIRTHDAY.

We honor you with the attached video…which rocks!

To our United States.Army, we salute you! Watch the video: https://lnkd.in/eaEzZpa

To Honor D-Day, June 6, 1944, from the 59 Veterans Project

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SHARE: TODAY’S DATE IS ONE NEVER TO BE FORGOT!

Seventy-four years ago today, June 6, 1944, the longest and most important day of the 20th century, amid the largest naval fleet and invasion force ever assembled in history, began what literally became the liberation of Europe and the world from tyranny and oppression. The amphibious assault and beach landings in Normandy, France.

D-Day!

All of us here at the 59 VETERANS PROJECT cannot recommend a more precise, thorough and profound write-up about this inimitable event than that which our post is linked to here. We salute all our veterans past and present and military personnel, and with great reverence offer a special shoutout to our greatest generation! Here: https://americaswatchtower.com/2018/06/06/d-day-remembered-2018/

To read more veterans posts…https://www.facebook.com/59veterans/

READ KRISTEN McHENRY’S FABULOUS BLOG!

jazz

PLEASE SHARE THIS AMAZING WRITING!

As always, my friend and fellow writer-poet Kristen McHenry’s weekly blog turns out the most entertaining and heartwarming posts possibly found throughout the entire World Wide Web.  And this week’s post is no exception.  In fact, it’s not only entertaining and heartwarming but also educational, informative and poignant and profound.  You deserve to read it…and deserve to make all your friends happy too! :–)

Here: http://thegoodtypist.blogspot.com/2017/03/reputable-poets-musical-chloroform_4.html

The Sullivan Brothers: an amazing story!

FIVE SULLIVAN BROTHERS
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World War II undoubtedly has more amazing stories to tell than any other war or time in history. One such amazing (and tragic) story is what inspired the making of what many consider the greatest war movie of all time: Saving Private Ryan.
On January 3, 1942, with the stipulation that they serve together, five brothers–the children of Thomas (1883–1965) and Alleta Sullivan (1895–1972) of Waterloo, Iowa–joined the US Navy. They were Joseph, Francis, Albert, Madison and George Sullivan, who later became known as “The Sullivans” and “The Fighting Sullivan Brothers.” After basic training and ready to serve in the war effort, all five were assigned to the light cruiser USS Juneau.
The Juneau participated in a number of naval engagements during the months-long Guadalcanal Campaign beginning in August 1942, and early in the morning of November 13, 1942, during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, it was struck by a Japanese torpedo and forced to withdraw. Later that day, it was struck again by a torpedo from Japanese submarine I-26. The torpedo likely hit the thinly armored cruiser at or near the ammunition magazines and the ship exploded and quickly sank.
Needless to say, all five Sullivan brothers were killed in action with the sinking of the USS Juneau. This unprecedented tragedy caused Congress to pass a law that military siblings not serve together on the same ship or combat command. And this unprecedented tragedy years later inspired film director Steven Spielberg to make the incredibly poignant WWII film Saving Private.
There is so much more to this amazing but tragic story than what we have told here. The brothers left a sister, Genevieve (1917–1975). Albert was survived by a wife and son. The Fighting Sullivan Brothers were national heroes. President Franklin Roosevelt sent a letter of condolence to their parents. Pope Pius XII sent a silver religious medal and rosary with his message of regret. The Iowa Senate and House adopted a formal resolution of tribute to the Sullivan brothers.
Thomas and Alleta Sullivan made speaking appearances at war plants and shipyards on behalf of the war effort. Later, Alleta participated in the launching of a destroyer: USS The Sullivans, named after her sons. Today and every Memorial Day, Veterans Day and July 4th we should remember the Sullivan Brothers and all our military veterans and active military who serve our great country as well as those who gave “the last full measure of devotion.” And this we are honored to do here at the 59 VETERANS PROJECT every day!
To read more about this amazing story, go here: http://goo.gl/7xVnN5. And to learn about our project to help our military veterans, please visit our Headquarters Company here: http://www.59veterans.com. We hope you join us and we may ascend this lofty summit together!

From the 59 Veterans Project: MOH Winner Douglas Munro!

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SOMETHING WORTH LEARNING & SHARING!

With over 100 million military personnel in uniform during its many years of conflict, World War II is the largest and most widespread war in human history. Its casualties are staggering: with over 60 million civilians killed and over 25 million military personnel losing their lives from over 60 countries around the globe.
Every branch of the U.S. Military was supremely engaged in WWII including the United States Coast Guard. And in its illustrious history of saving lives and rescuing people at sea, only one member of the U.S. Coast Guard was ever awarded America’s highest award for valor: The Medal of Honor. And it occurred during World War II.
His was Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro. His MOH citation reads in part: “For extraordinary heroism and conspicuous gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty as Officer-in-Charge of a group of Higgins boats, engaged in the evacuation of a Battalion of Marines trapped by enemy Japanese forces at Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on September 27, 1942…” As it is, Munro saved hundreds of Marines that day, and in the process contributed greatly to America’s first military victory in WWII. During his valiant act he also gave the “last full measure of devotion,” and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor and also the Purple Heart Medal in May 1943 by President Roosevelt at the White House.  Accepting the awards were his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Munro of Cle Elum, Washington.

All of us here at the 59 VETERANS PROJECT proudly salute the United States Coast Guard and all our military veterans for whom our project is intended.  We also remember and salute Douglas A. Munro, Coast Guardsman and hero of the Battle of Guadalcanal.  His valor and gallantry will never be forgotten!

To learn more about Signalman First Class Douglas A. Munro and the Battle of Guadalcanal, please visit this website: bit.ly/1QeXnRr.  And to learn about our 59 VETERANS PROJECT and our enterprise to teach and help veterans transition into viable careers in 4k/3D photography and videography, please visit our headquarters company here: http://59veterans.com/. May the spirit and heroism of Douglas A. Munro and other heroic veterans inspire us and guide us as we ascend the summit together!

Moving Masters Wants to Tell You About Audie Murphy

AUDIE MURPHY
PLEASE SHARE THIS WITH VETERANS & FRIENDS!
MOVING MASTERS enjoys providing its flat-rate, long-distance moving services to customers throughout the New York, NYC, Tri-State region and east coast of the U.S. We value all our customers and appreciate their appreciation of the valuable service we provide them. But we have to admit we value our seniors and veterans most of all, perhaps.
Just visit our Seniors & Veterans page on our website (http://www.movingmasters.net/) and you’ll see what we mean. So it is our great pleasure to share this post from the 59 Vets Project on the subject of a renowned U.S. veteran…who was undoubtedly one of the bravest men to ever live!
AUDIE MURPHY, U.S. ARMY
Probably the most decorated combat soldier in United States military history is World War II hero Audie Murphy. Among his medals and awards are the Congressional Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, the Bronze Star (2) with Combat V, the Legion of Merit, three Purple Hearts, the French Legion of Honor, and so many more it’s impossible to enumerate them here. Audie also was promoted to the final officer rank of captain after starting out as an enlisted man. What is really funny is the fact that he attempted to enlist in every branch of the service but was rejected because of his size, until the Army finally accepted him.
Immediately after the war Audie was discovered by the great film actor James Cagney who then helped him get into films and become a movie star in his own right, where he made over 40 films, some of them with the biggest movie stars and directors in Hollywood. In addition, Audie Murphy wrote several hit songs and gripping poetry, a sample of which is included with this post.
To learn more about America’s most decorated war hero, you can visit this online site: http://www.audiemurphy.com/biography.htm. And the next time you sit down to watch a good movie, watch one of Audie Murphy’s fine film classics!
THE CROSSES GROW ON ANZIO by Audie Murphy
Oh, gather ’round me, comrades,
and listen while I speak;
Of a war, a war, a war —
where hell is six feet deep.
Along the shore, the cannons roar.
Oh how can a soldier sleep?
The going’s slow on Anzio
and hell is six feet deep.
Praise be to God for this captured sod
that’s rich where blood does seep;
With yours and mine, like butchered swine;
and hell is six feet deep.
That death does wait there’s no debate;
no triumph will we reap
The crosses grow on Anzio,
where hell is six feet deep.

59 VETERANS PROJECT: AMERICA’S MOST DECORATED WAR HERO!

Audie_Murphy

 

PLEASE SHARE THIS WITH VETERANS & FRIENDS!

Probably the most decorated combat soldier in United States military history is World War II hero Audie Murphy. Among his medals and awards are the Congressional Medal of Honor, the Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, the Bronze Star (2) with Combat V, the Legion of Merit, three Purple Hearts, the French Legion of Honor, and so many more it’s impossible to enumerate them here.  Audie also was promoted to the final officer rank of captain after starting out as an enlisted man.  What is really funny is the fact that he attempted to enlist in every branch of the service but was rejected because of his size, until the Army finally accepted him.

Immediately after the war Audie was discovered by the great film actor James Cagney who then helped him get into films and become a movie star in his own right, where he made over 40 films, some of them with the biggest movie stars and directors in Hollywood.  In addition, Audie Murphy wrote several hit songs and gripping poetry, a sample of which is included with this post.

We at the 59 Veterans Project would like to salute Audie Murphy and all our veterans and active duty military.  And we can’t wait to catch the next Audie Murphy movie marathon on AMC!

To learn more about America’s most decorated war hero, you can visit this online site: http://www.audiemurphy.com/biography.htm.  And to learn more about the 59 Veterans Project, please stop on by our main site here: http://www.59veterans.com.  We can’t wait to serve and serve with our veterans upon the sacred grounds of our national parks.

THE CROSSES GROW ON ANZIO by Audie Murphy

Oh, gather ’round me, comrades,
and listen while I speak;
Of a war, a war, a war —
where hell is six feet deep.

Along the shore, the cannons roar.
Oh how can a soldier sleep?
The going’s slow on Anzio
and hell is six feet deep.

Praise be to God for this captured sod
that’s rich where blood does seep;
With yours and mine, like butchered swine;
and hell is six feet deep.

That death does wait there’s no debate;
no triumph will we reap
The crosses grow on Anzio,
where hell is six feet deep.